funnyordie:

21 North Korean Hairstyles Approved by Kim Jong Un

Clearly, reports of the Dear Leader forcing all young men in North Korea to adopt his hairstyle have been greatly exaggerated.

See the full list of approved cuts here.

Reblogged from Funny Or Die
hayward-badwan:

The Horrors on the cover of the NME Mag

hayward-badwan:

The Horrors on the cover of the NME Mag

rhysjoejoshtomfarisblog:

Rhys Webb getting his album signed by Paul McCartney!
(While Josh silently is losing his shit)

rhysjoejoshtomfarisblog:

Rhys Webb getting his album signed by Paul McCartney!

(While Josh silently is losing his shit)

But never have I been a blue calm sea. I have always been a storm.
— Stevie Nicks (via styleandsubstance)
Reblogged from self-titled life
fuckyeahmoz:

"These are the convictions of a writer tethered to the end of an ancestral chain; the last representative of a nation in decline, for whom affairs of the state are synonymous with affairs of the heart. By donning again the mantle of Billy Fury's gold lamé jacket (already inhereited by Mick Travis in O Lucky Man!) at his controversial appearance (with Union Jack) at an open-air concert in Finsbury Park, it could seem as though Morrissey was positioned at the end of a particular sensibility, marking the shift of Englishness away from the tradition of ambivalence signified by Greene’s empathetic description of Dallow, Spicer, Pinkie, Cubitt (the teenage gangsters of Brighton Rock, whom Morrissey listed under his few friends on Vauxhall & I) and on an infantilist comedy of recognition - the Britishness of ‘Brit Pop’ - in which referral to the popular culture of the early 1970s, in particular, would be a virtual compound of irony and emulation based largely on stylistic cleverness.” - Michael Bracewell, England Is Mine

fuckyeahmoz:

"These are the convictions of a writer tethered to the end of an ancestral chain; the last representative of a nation in decline, for whom affairs of the state are synonymous with affairs of the heart. By donning again the mantle of Billy Fury's gold lamé jacket (already inhereited by Mick Travis in O Lucky Man!) at his controversial appearance (with Union Jack) at an open-air concert in Finsbury Park, it could seem as though Morrissey was positioned at the end of a particular sensibility, marking the shift of Englishness away from the tradition of ambivalence signified by Greene’s empathetic description of Dallow, Spicer, Pinkie, Cubitt (the teenage gangsters of Brighton Rock, whom Morrissey listed under his few friends on Vauxhall & I) and on an infantilist comedy of recognition - the Britishness of ‘Brit Pop’ - in which referral to the popular culture of the early 1970s, in particular, would be a virtual compound of irony and emulation based largely on stylistic cleverness.” - Michael Bracewell, England Is Mine